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SINI2010 – Gil Kuperman July 23, 2010

Posted by peterjmurray in conference, education, nursing informatics, SINI2010, USA.
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It’s Friday morning in Baltimore; temperatures are supposed to get up to near 100F today. Attendance at the Orioles game didn’t look too great last night (my hotel room overlooks Camden Yards).

The distinguished lecture this morning is from Gil Kuperman, from NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital and Columbia Biomedical Informatics in New York, NY. His talk is titled “Health Information Exchange: Why Are We Doing It and What Are We Doing?” His premise for his talk is that we are at an inflection point in respect of interoperability, and that some of the responses to ‘meaningful use’ are altering the landscape for interoperability. He outlined the role of clinical data in giving a more accurate picture of the patient’s needs, but also noted the wider uses of such data, for public health and research. He referred back to the 2001 report and recommendations on ‘A strategy for building the national health information infrastructure’, which had three components, including health care provider, personal health and population health dimensions.

Gil then went on to review the 2004 origins of ONC within a four-part strategy which had little funding for real implementation. It did highlight, however, the importance of health information exchange for EHR adoption, and some encouraging signs for interoperability. He noted the origins of the first prototype National Health Information Network (NHIN) project in 2004, and the growth of the “NHIN1” model as a ‘network of networks’. NHIN2 in 2007 aimed to demonstrate interoperable and secure health information exchange, with specific use cases.

After an exploration of other phases/stages of NHIN, Gil moved on the NHIN Direct (www.nhindirect.org), which aims to support stage 1 meaningful use. It aims to push data to a known recipient and automate health information exchange that is currently being undertaken by other modes.

He highlighted a number of challenges and questions that still exist, including:

  • Is it really easier? – need an address book (central authority) – need authorization scheme – need auditing
  • How much of the problem does it solve? – “Push” vs. “pull” – Important use cases left out
  • Need agreed upon security standards – Need governance to create policies – Need compliance to assure policies followed
  • How well does it work for large organizations? – Putting an incoming lab result in the right chart

The NHINDirect model is not seen by many as an end in itself, but is seen as complementary to other aspects, and may or may not address some of the use cases identified within NHIN2.

Gil ended by noting that many questions are raised by the contrasting models, ie “Sending messages” vs. “Information Retrieval”, does it enable innovative care models, how will it affect RHIOs in the future, and will it allow migration to more sophisticated health information exchange?

Some interesting ideas were raised, and it is useful to compare with the situation and questions raised 5 years ago in the UK with the development of the NHS Spine model.

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Comments»

1. erdley - July 24, 2010

Well, don’t miss the temps & humidity. But, sorry I missed Gil’s message. It (his message) sounds like messages / questions before and most notably early in the drive here for RHIOs. Guess time does not equate with change.


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