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Rutgers 30th Conference – Day 2 Summary April 17, 2012

Posted by peterjmurray in conference, education, future, Keynote, nursing informatics.
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I think I am losing my ‘blogging touch’; I find it increasingly difficult to do the live blogging ‘on the fly’ of conference sessions that I have done in the past. maybe it is simply lack of practice, due to doing more tweeting from events. So, this post is a summary of Monday’s presentations and activity. My tweets can be found on @peterjmurray, or searching for hashtag #Rutgers30

The first full day of the conference began with a keynote from Michelle Troseth (@CPMRCmichelle on Twitter). Michelle is Chief Professional Practice Officer at Elsevier CPM Resource Center, and her talk was titled “Bridging the gap between interprofessional education and evidence-based practice: leveraging technology”. She began by noting the many problems of system integration in healthcare services, and that evidence-based care will be critical to the future, so there is a need to think about team-based care and interprofessional care-planning. She asked whether computer nowadays are getting in the way of interprofessional relationships, and discussed the need to design patient-centric systems.

She introduced the TIGER Initiative (http://www.thetigerinitiative.org/)  and TIGER recommendations around being interdisciplinary and evidence-based, as well as covering a number of reports that over the years have advocated the need for transformation of practice and modes of working, including:

  • Carnegie Foundation – Preparation of the Professions – studies call for radical transformation on how we teach and prepare nurses and clinicians for future of care.
  • IOM report on future of nursing – “nurses should be full partners with physicians and other health professions in redesigning care”

Michelle was also awarded the 15th Annual Award for the advancement of technology in healthcare that is traditionally presented at this event.

Other speakers during the day (I was only able attend one of each parallel session, most of which I was chairing/moderating):

Darlene Scott (Saskatchewan, Canada): Connecting the dots: using Web 2.0 tools for interprofessional education –  explored the development of a core IPE (interprofessional education) curriculum to embed in nursing and science and health programmes. It was designed to prepare collaborative, practice-ready care givers.

The conference continues today (Tuesday), beginning with a panel session and followed by individual presentations and keynotes. The conference website is at http://nursing.rutgers.edu/conferences/30th-annual-international-interprofessional-technology-conference

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Rutgers 30th Conference – Day 1, Kulikowski Keynote April 16, 2012

Posted by peterjmurray in conference, education, future, Keynote, nursing informatics.
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The Rutgers College of Nursing’s Thirtieth Annual International Interprofessional Technology Conference, in New Brunswick, New Jersey, USA  formally started on 15 April, 2012. Held at the Hyatt Regency New Brunswick, the fact that this year sees the 30th offering of this event makes it probably the longest-running annual event of its kind within nursing informatics within the USA. At least two of this year’s speakers, Casimir Kulikowski and Diane Skiba spoke at the second event, in 1984.

After pre-conference workshops, the opening keynote was given by Prof. Casimir Kulikowski, Board of Governors Professor of Computer Science at Rutgers University. Cas is also, among other post, a Vice president of the International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA – www.imia.org) and a co-editor of the IMIA Yearbook of Medical Informatics. He spoke on “How technology helps to improve healthcare globally”, although many of the points raised in his presentation pointed to areas in which technology does not always work at its best to improve health, but has other impacts.

Cas noted that, while we continue to see major advances in computer-information sciences, and advances around increasingly distributed, ubiquitous and mobile technologies, their impacts vary due to the contrasting challenges of developed and developing countries in applying information and computer technologies to health. The application of current technologies to the challenges of the burdens of chronic disease in the ageing in developed countries is still immature, and technologies are not readily available in many parts of the developing world where younger populations still face burdens of infectious disease. He noted the increasing economic challenges of radical shifts in the population support ratio, and also noted that wide disparities exist in terms of gender differences in the incidence of many diseases.

Among the questions he raised was whether it is better to invest spending (especially in terms of health spending) in breakthrough technologies that might have major impact, or to incremental improvements in systems. He noted that incremental changes often result in changes to systems and processes, and do not necessarily benefit people, or work in the best interests of patients.  They often occur in a system of legal constraints, and are responses to needs to reduce costs rather than improve care. He suggested the need to look at technologies that stimulate best care practices, and outlined examples of health-enabling technologies, smart homes/environments and social computing, to provide patient empowerment, self-care and preventive healthcare. He cited the work of colleagues such as Patti Brennan in Wisconsin, George Demiris and colleagues in Washington state, and Haux and Marschollek in Germany who are researching many of these areas, although noted that such work is still in early stages and many of the technologies remain immature.

Cas raised the idea that technology should not at the centre, but be part of a movement towards changing how people interact with technology in the home. There is, he suggests, a need for pervasive, personalised technologies to provide support (ambient assisted living), and that there are demonstrable cost savings if older persons can be supported in homes as opposed to being in hospital.  He introduced Demiris’ work on resistance to care if it is obtrusive, and noted that while smart home technology has the potential to support independence etc.,  using technology can also promote dependency.

Monday sees the first full day of presentations. The conference website is at http://nursing.rutgers.edu/conferences/30th-annual-international-interprofessional-technology-conference

TIGER, TIGER, burning bright July 22, 2010

Posted by peterjmurray in conference, education, future, nursing informatics, SINI2010.
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The parallel afternoon sessions are due to start. I am attending a very well-attended session, “The TIGER Initiative: Adoption of Health IT and Meaningful Use for Nurses and Other Disciplines”, a panel presentation and discussion with Patricia Hinton Walker, Vice President for Nursing Policy & Professor of Nursing at Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences; Diane J. Skiba, Professor & Health Care Informatics Coordinator, University of Colorado College of Nursing; and Brian Gugerty, Gugerty Consulting, LLC. The session covers reports on TIGER Phases II and III ; specifically, outcomes of the Competencies Collaborative with implications for Education, Faculty Development, and Staff Development, along with progress on the emerging TIGER III, Virtual Learning Environment.

TIGER, for the uninitiated, is “Technology Informatics Guiding Educational Reform” (http://www.tigersummit.com). The TIGER vision is to allow informatics tools, principles, theories and practices to be used by nurses to make healthcare safer, effective, efficient, patient-centered, timely and equitable; and interweave enabling technologies transparently into nursing practice and education, making information technology the stethoscope for the 21st century.

Patricia started the session by giving an overview of the history of TIGER, especially phases I and II – reports are available at http://www.tigersummit.com/Downloads.html TIGER phase III will focus on implementation, integrating the TIGER recommendations into the nursing community along with colleagues from all disciplines across the continuum of care. These activities are focused on creating a Virtual Learning Center and developing another invitational summit.

Brian Gugerty next gave an overview of the work of nine collaboratives, focusing on the informatics competencies work (http://www.tigersummit.com/Competencies_New_B949.html). Informatics competencies for nurses were seen to be at two levels, ie all practicing and graduating nursing students; and nursing leaders. Existing work in the literature on basic computer competencies and information literacy/management was explored, from an international perspective. Work related to this is available at http://tigercompetencies.pbworks.com/

Diane Skiba talked about the education and faculty development collaborative work – http://www.tigersummit.com/Education_New.html She explored how to engage faculty to move the agenda forward, although noted the difficulties of making changes in higher education. She identified the challenge as that of preparing nurses to practice in a technology-rich world, and addressing areas of both teaching about technology and teaching with technology.

Patricia concluded the presentations by introducing TIGER phase III, which is about dissemination of the results to date of the initiatives and collaboratives, and the development of the virtual learning environment (VLE), as one of several potential solutions to addressing the problems. The VLE work is also beginning to address a wider interdisciplinary audience, including patients and ‘cosnumers’, and not just to nurses.

Session 6F ‘Virtual Reality’ SINI09 07.24.09 Friday July 24, 2009

Posted by Scott Erdley in conference, education, future, health informatics, SINI2009, speaker.
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John Miller, MN, RN and Cathy Walker, titled “Nursing Education in 3D: Leveraging Virtual Worlds and Immersive Learning Simulations”. Using 2 screens and projectors to demo SecondLife (SL). Slides at MUVers.org and at Slideshare.com as well as SINI site for this conference as well. IMG_0157 Well attended with some 25 or so people in attendance. To emphasize and show better on screen the session is run with room lights off. They have created an ‘OS’ so medical equipment interacts within SL, records to off-world website, and so forth. Presentation is very verbal and demo-like to show how used and what it is all about.

Some events are scripted or the instructor can adjust as needed during the scenario. Also able to see thought / decision-making processes of student, instructor, or both if this is something desired. Interesting environment for students to experience such as monitor, drugs (administration), reading physician orders, IV pumps, and so forth. There is also a bit of ‘selling’ here by the presenters about their corporation and services for hospital institutions. Question about research but there is no research ’cause they have no time (she is part of 3 companies; he is involved with full-time teaching along with collaborating other companies). A person recommended is Stephanie Stewart (formerly of UofW, Oshkosh). Otherwise very interactive with rolling ‘Q&A’ between audience and presenters. Nicely done. See YouTube clip, too, for a demonstration >>>

Papers on ‘human computer interaction’ June 29, 2009

Posted by peterjmurray in conference, Europe, future, NI2009, nursing informatics.
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Kathy Dallest, from Scotland spoke on ‘The online managed knowledge network that shares knowledge for ehealth in NHS Scotland’ – http://www.nmahp.scot.nhs.uk

Nurses, midwives and allied health professions are 72% of clinical workforce in Scotland – largest group who will use electronic systems to support delivery of healthcare and information management. She described the portal that has been developed to provide a managed knowledge network; the model builds on the idea of communities of practice, with communities operating across disciplinary boundaries. The project found a large diversity of roles among the staff working in ehealth; they often felt isolated, with a need/desire to share information.

The nmahp site uses topic rooms and expert searches on subject areas. Kathy also mentioned the ‘using information’ website, and international collaboration – http://www.usinginfo.org and the clinical ehealth toolkit. The MKN site is open to anyone to join.

Elina Kontio from University of Turku in Finland spoke on ‘Key elements of successful care process of patients with heart symptoms in an emergency care – would an ERP system help?’ She says healthcare has been slow to use process-oriented systems for decision making. The research she described has looked at identifying the key elements of care processes of patients with acute heart problems; used a critical incident technique to collect data on the nurses’ roles and interactions with patients, with a sample of 50 nurses across 3 hospitals in southern Finland. The study developed recommendations on development and use of enterprise planning systems to provide alerts, decision support etc. in care continuum.

Debra Wolf presented on ‘Nurses using futuristic technology in today’s healthcare setting’. She talked about voice-assisted technology to do point of care documentation in a community hospital in USA. The system is wireless and used for charting, reminders and prioritising tasks. The system comprises a wearable computer and headset, speech recognition engine and software to send and receive patient orders and to do real-time documentation using speech-to-text. The system has reduced documentation time (by up to75% – but also found little diffrence in completeness of the documentation) and to provide proactive reminders about issues (such as fall risk) pertinent to individual patients. It has improved adherenece to policies and so enhanced quality of care. The pilot study found there was reduction in potential for infection, as nurses only touch one device once a day, as opposed to mutliple touches with other computer systems (eg mouse, keyboard, etc).

http://healthcare.vocollect.com/index.php/acute

Looking towards “Web 4.0” in health and nursing June 26, 2009

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Members of the krew (Margaret, Scott, Peter, Ulrich) have had a pleasant morning strolling around Helsinki Zoo. We have been bouncing ideas around, in part due to planning for the Web 2.0 panel that Scott and I are doing later in the week, and started thinking about what might be the next stage beyond Web 2.0 and Web 3.0. Web 2.0 is already with us, and people are starting to discuss seriously what Web 3.0 might be – many people see it as the true ‘semantic web’ – but what comes after that – and what might it mean for nursing and health?

We have just done a quick Google search for Web 4.0, especially relating to health and nursing, and no-one seems to have started talking about it yet. Nova Spivack wrote an article considering the move beyonf Web 3.0 to be towards the ‘WebOS’ (but are we already seeing that with the development  of cloud computing and some of the moves within Web 2.0/3.0?); he also talked about ‘intelligent personal agents’ (http://blogs.zdnet.com/BTL/?p=4499). Is direct brain-computer interface (invasive or non-invasive) part of what Web 4.0 will be about? Is Web 4.0 related to increasingly blurred lines between ‘SL-worlds’ and the ‘real world’?

We will be batting around these ideas over the next few weeks as we work on developing a discussion/ideas paper on these issues.