jump to navigation

Last day of SINI2009 – Saturday 07.25.09 Morning Keynote July 25, 2009

Posted by Scott Erdley in conference, education, Keynote, nursing informatics, SINI2009.
Tags: , , , ,
trackback

This is my last entry for the conference, readers. Had a great time. I have to catch a flight back to home base (Buffalo, NY) and with the weather such as it is these past few days (traditional Baltimore – h3 (hzy, hot & humid)) as well as in Buffalo (humid & stormy) there’s a chance I’ll be parked at BWI for a while. There’s also a chance I won’t. Either way, given transit time to the airport via the Lightrail, I will be departing for BWI at 10am local (end of opening presentation, too).

Introduction is provided by local STTI chapter president because this chapter, in honor of 50 years of service, is sponsoring Dr. Staggers’ presentation. Opening keynote is Nancy Staggers, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor & Director for Nursing Informatics, University of Utah College of Nursing. Title of her presentation is “Optimizing the usability of clinical systems: Past work and future directions”. Start time is a little behind normal most likely due to this being the last day of the conference and participants are a bit tardy arriving for the morning food before the session. Nothing unusual here with this, to be honest. Good attendance in spite of the last day of the conference. Discussion will cover usability, synthesis of usability research, future directions and then example (from her research).

Usability deals with solutions, context/environment, and specific goals. Related to human facotrs, ergonomics, HCI and usability (demonstrated via a modified Venn-type diagram. Talks about usability and cpoe in health care practice (Leapfrog Group cited). Reviews systems penetration due to ARRA $’s and Brailler’s (09) talk about need for specialist. DaVinci surgical system cited as tech example. Continuum of info & tech in nursing practice is depicted related to Essentials of Baccalaurate Education (AACN). Need for usability of phr’s, too, reviewed. Also provides a review of past usability research with her doctoral student, Greg Alexander. Search was extensive with exclusion criteria outlined. The process is described in detail from beginning to end. Bottom line, out of more than 11,000 citations, only 34 relevant articles (with 50 studies). Organized into effectiveness, efficiency and satisfaction. A lot to do with information searching, potential error with device designs (e.g.: IV pumps), and so forth. Satisfaction results indicate users want knowledge worth of mention (dense screens, graphic designs, etc.), heuristic evals of devices, remedy the no apparent rationale for selecting products to evaluate. Future directions include expansion of types of devices to study (Only 2 IV pums, PCAs and 1 EHR studied), settings & participants, integrated displays and the type of study outcome variables. Need to examine cognitive burden workflows, need for national db for study results, and, EHR comparative studies re: usability. Additional future directions include administration, education & research areas, look at actual clinical settings (vs. simulated labs), and study interdisciplinary teams. Now she launches into her work on change-of-shift report as example of the issues encountered during this literature review. Employed a variety of methods of research (observation, audio-taped with qualitative analysis after transcription). Results of this study are part of this example discussion. 4 themes are ‘the dance of report (largest percentage), just the facts, professional nursing practice and lightening the load’. Professional practice involved actions, reasoned judgments, care decisions, problem-solving, and such. Context of report issues included noise level, interruptions, patient loads, and report from 2-3 separate nurses. Overall discussion includes issues of ‘speed bumps’, high level of jargon, no report structure and ehr not any part of shift report.  Nicely done.

Advertisements

Comments»

No comments yet — be the first.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: